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Haydn and CPE Bach

Part of the 2015-16 Far Beyond the Stars Season

Add to my Calendar 27-02-2016 19:30 27-02-2016 21:30 36 Haydn and CPE Bach Join the Chester Bach Singers as they perform what is arguably Haydn’s greatest single composition, The Nelson Mass and CPE Bach’s Magnificat. Featuring soloists Cally Youdell, Joanna Harries, Thomas Kelly and Graham McCusker, with orchestral accompaniment. About the Works: Haydn's Nelson Mass We don’t know for sure how Haydn’s Missa in Angustiis, which can be translated “Mass in times of trouble and fear”, came to be known as Nelson Mass but, in 1798, when Haydn wrote it, Europe was embroiled in the Napoleonic wars and times were certainly troubled. The news that Napoleon had been defeated in the Battle of the Nile by British Forces led by Admiral Horatio Nelson came just at the time of the first performance of this work and, in the mood of the time, it became known popularly as the Nelson Mass. In 1800 Nelson and Lady Hamilton visited the Esterházy palace and may even have heard the work performed. Haydn’s biographer H. C. Robbins Landon writes that this mass is “arguably Haydn’s greatest single composition”. CPE Bach's Magnificat Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach was the second surviving son of the great Johann Sebastian Bach, and his first wife, Maria Barbara. The most famous and prolific of the Bach sons, he was also widely esteemed as a keyboard player and theorist. It was during his Berlin years that, in 1749, he composed his only important church work, the Magnificat. It takes its text from Mary’s canticle from St. Luke’s Gospel (Chapter 1, v. 46–55) and according to a pupil at the Thomasschule it was performed in Leipzig while his father was still alive – sometime before the end of July 1750. The work contains a number of unmistakable borrowings from his father’s Magnificat: the melodies in the Fecit potentium and Deposuit are, for example, almost identical. However, the choruses take second place to the solo vocal numbers (which quantitatively, too, predominate) with their lyrical, faintly opera-like elements. Nevertheless, the final chorus, Sicut erat in principio, has a recurring theme which has often been compared with that of the Kyrie in Mozart’s Requiem, finally concluding with an extended Amen, 183 bars long.   St Mary's Church, Chester DD/MM/YYYY

Details

St Mary's Church
Handbridge
Handbridge

Chester
Cheshire
CH4 7HL
England


Programme

Joseph HaydnMass no.11 in D minor 'Nelson', Hob.XXII:11
Carl Philipp Emanuel BachMagnificat in D major, H.772

Performers

Martin Bussey – conductor
Cally Youdell – soprano
Joanna Harries – alto
Thomas Kelly – tenor
Graham McCusker – bass

Chester Bach Singers

Other concerts in this Series (+)

Programme Note

Join the Chester Bach Singers as they perform what is arguably Haydn’s greatest single composition, The Nelson Mass and CPE Bach’s Magnificat.

Featuring soloists Cally Youdell, Joanna Harries, Thomas Kelly and Graham McCusker, with orchestral accompaniment.

About the Works:

Haydn's Nelson Mass

We don’t know for sure how Haydn’s Missa in Angustiis, which can be translated “Mass in times of trouble and fear”, came to be known as Nelson Mass but, in 1798, when Haydn wrote it, Europe was embroiled in the Napoleonic wars and times were certainly troubled. The news that Napoleon had been defeated in the Battle of the Nile by British Forces led by Admiral Horatio Nelson came just at the time of the first performance of this work and, in the mood of the time, it became known popularly as the Nelson Mass. In 1800 Nelson and Lady Hamilton visited the Esterházy palace and may even have heard the work performed. Haydn’s biographer H. C. Robbins Landon writes that this mass is “arguably Haydn’s greatest single composition”.

CPE Bach's Magnificat

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach was the second surviving son of the great Johann Sebastian Bach, and his first wife, Maria Barbara. The most famous and prolific of the Bach sons, he was also widely esteemed as a keyboard player and theorist.

It was during his Berlin years that, in 1749, he composed his only important church work, the Magnificat. It takes its text from Mary’s canticle from St. Luke’s Gospel (Chapter 1, v. 46–55) and according to a pupil at the Thomasschule it was performed in Leipzig while his father was still alive – sometime before the end of July 1750. The work contains a number of unmistakable borrowings from his father’s Magnificat: the melodies in the Fecit potentium and Deposuit are, for example, almost identical. However, the choruses take second place to the solo vocal numbers (which quantitatively, too, predominate) with their lyrical, faintly opera-like elements. Nevertheless, the final chorus, Sicut erat in principio, has a recurring theme which has often been compared with that of the Kyrie in Mozart’s Requiem, finally concluding with an extended Amen, 183 bars long.

 

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