Please note: This concert is in the past and has already taken place.

The Sounds of Spain

Free piano recital by Emilie Capulet

Part of the Ealing Music and Film Festival 2017

Add to my Calendar 08-02-2017 13:10 08-02-2017 15:10 36 The Sounds of Spain Like Bach and Handel, Domenico Scarlatti was born in 1685.  It was his move to Portugal in 1719 which unleashed his true contribution to Western musical culture in the form of 555 keyboard sonatas.  Whereas Scarlatti's income came from private patrons, Soler was a church administrator who wrote music as part of that service;  masses and motets for God, and also concertos, quintets, pieces for solo organ and 150 sonatas for solo keyboard. La Puerta del Vino (The Gate of WIne) is one of Debussy's many invocations of Spain, where he describes Spanish life and passionate temperament based on a postcard he had received of the Moorish gate by the Alhambra Palace in Granada.   Albeniz wrote operas, zarzuelas, concertos and many volumes of salon pieces for solo piano; his real legacy, however, is the collection of 12 pieces which make up Iberia. Evocacion is an impressionistic reminiscence of the old North Spain, combining elements of the Andalusian fandango and the northern Spanish jota.  El Corpus en Sevilla describes the Corpus Christi procession in Seville; a processional march yields to a mournful saeta over flamenco guitars.  Triana, the sixth piece in Iberia, describes the gypsy quarter of Seville where music (and everything else) are felt quite differently. Ravel was one of many composers to orchestrat Albeniz' Iberia. He was born a few miles from the Spanish border and could write the most evocative music of Spain from the confines of a Paris appartment.  Alborada del gracioso is the fourth piece from Ravel's suite Miroirs;  Alborada literally means dawn but this is the 'dawn of the buffoon', where a grotesque lover prances to the strumming of guitars.  The din gathers and Ravel deploys all manner of wickedly demanding piano technique - double glissandi and repeated notes in particular - for the close of this erotic frenzy. St Mary's Church, London DD/MM/YYYY

Details

St Mary's Church
St Mary's Road
Ealing

London
W5 5RH
England


Programme

Domenico ScarlattiKeyboard Sonata in E major, K.380
Maurice RavelMiroir: no.4, Alborada del gracioso
Isaac AlbénizIberia: Evocation, El Corpus en Sevilla, Triana
Claude DebussyLa Puerta del Vino
Antonio SolerSonata in D major, No.84

Performers

Emilie Capulet – piano

Other concerts in this Series (+)

Programme Note

Like Bach and Handel, Domenico Scarlatti was born in 1685.  It was his move to Portugal in 1719 which unleashed his true contribution to Western musical culture in the form of 555 keyboard sonatas.  Whereas Scarlatti's income came from private patrons, Soler was a church administrator who wrote music as part of that service;  masses and motets for God, and also concertos, quintets, pieces for solo organ and 150 sonatas for solo keyboard.

La Puerta del Vino (The Gate of WIne) is one of Debussy's many invocations of Spain, where he describes Spanish life and passionate temperament based on a postcard he had received of the Moorish gate by the Alhambra Palace in Granada.  

Albeniz wrote operas, zarzuelas, concertos and many volumes of salon pieces for solo piano; his real legacy, however, is the collection of 12 pieces which make up Iberia. Evocacion is an impressionistic reminiscence of the old North Spain, combining elements of the Andalusian fandango and the northern Spanish jota.  El Corpus en Sevilla describes the Corpus Christi procession in Seville; a processional march yields to a mournful saeta over flamenco guitars.  Triana, the sixth piece in Iberia, describes the gypsy quarter of Seville where music (and everything else) are felt quite differently.

Ravel was one of many composers to orchestrat Albeniz' Iberia. He was born a few miles from the Spanish border and could write the most evocative music of Spain from the confines of a Paris appartment.  Alborada del gracioso is the fourth piece from Ravel's suite Miroirs;  Alborada literally means dawn but this is the 'dawn of the buffoon', where a grotesque lover prances to the strumming of guitars.  The din gathers and Ravel deploys all manner of wickedly demanding piano technique - double glissandi and repeated notes in particular - for the close of this erotic frenzy.

Get a route map

Your Map

If you have any questions, please contact us using the form below, or send an e-mail to info@classicalevents.co.uk.

All form fields are required.

Please check your details and try again.

Thank you for contacting us. We will contact you regarding your enquiry as soon as possible.